40 Best Free Domain Name Generators (2018 Edition)

I’ve played with a lot of business name and domain name generators in my lifetime (in fact, I’ve probably wasted quite a few hours tinkering with names that have never seen the light of day!).  For me, it’s quite an addictive past time, particularly when you have the right tools at your disposal to make the brain-storming process all the more productive.  Below I’ve provided an overview of my favoured domain name and business name generators in 2018.  If I’ve missed any gems, please feel free to give them a shout-out in the comments section following this blog post.

Shopify Business Name Generator

Shopify used to have the absolute best business name idea generator with built-in URL checker in the biz!   I

shopify-url-availability-generator

It was so darn good that people were ignoring Shopify platform all together, and only visiting Shopify.com to use the tool itself.   My theory, is that Shopify have consequently scaled down the tool to ward away the tyre-kickers, as it now only focuses names that are available within the Shopify store eco-system.  That said, it’s still a good initial source of business name ideas, you’ll just need to check the .com domain name availability separately if you stumble across a potential business name that tickles you fancy.

shopify-business-name-generator

Check out the Shopify Business Name Generator

Namemesh

Namemesh is hands-down one of the best domain name generators on the net.   The features of this unbelievably free tool are rich, with the ability filter domain names to .com only, or focus on other potential suffixes such as .io and .co too.   Another great feature of Namemesh, is that if you keep scrolling down the page, the tool will go searching for more and more ideas, presenting you with literally thousands of interesting variations that you’d struggle to think of yourself.   I highly recommend this domain name generator and find myself using it frequently (the main limitation for me is when seeking local domain name ideas, such as the .com.au for Australian websites).

namemesh-domain-name-generator-crypto-trader

Check out Namemesh

RHYMER

This isn’t a domain name generator, however Rhymer is worth an honourable mention all the same. Based on the success of my very first blog TShirtAlert.com, which seemingly owed some of its success to its memorable & catchy name,  I always suggest going to the Rhyming dictionary and entering in your keyword.  If a rhyming word catches your eye, add the two words together in a standard GoDaddy.com search engine and cross your fingers the domain name is available!

rhymer-crypto

Check out Rhymer

 

https://iwantmyname.com/

https://www.coolnameideas.com/business-name-generator/

Business Name Generator

https://instantdomainsearch.com/

http://www.domainsbot.com/

http://www.namejet.com/

http://www.namestall.com/domain-name-generator

https://domainpunch.com/domainfilter/

http://www.names4brands.com/z

https://www.domainnamesoup.com/

http://unique-names.com/word-mixer.php

http://www.domainpuzzler.com/

https://domaintyper.com/

http://www.panabee.com/

http://impossibility.org/

https://domainr.com/

http://www.bustaname.com/

http://www.domainhole.com/

http://www.namestation.com/

http://wordoid.com/

https://www.brandings.com/search_tips.php

http://www.dotomator.com/

http://www.hipsterbusiness.name/

https://www.namerific.com/

http://www.mithrilandmages.com/utilities/BusinessNames.php

Business Name Generator

Home

https://www.oneclickname.com/

http://www.naminum.com/

http://www.domainpuzzler.com/

http://www.crazynamer.com/

http://fitsmallbusiness.com/ultimate-business-name-generator/

https://anadea.info/tools/online-business-name-generator/

https://namesmith.io/

https://getsocio.com/tools/business-name-generator

https://www.freshbooks.com/business-name-generator

https://www.brandroot.com/

The Freedom Sliders

One of my favourite surf brands, The Critical Slide Society has used freedom, and a sweet-ass Defender, as the inspiration for their latest clothing range.

The autumn collection is called The Freedom Sliders and is hitting stores now.  The photo shoot for this range not only happens to feature some of my favourite pastime (surfing and camping), but my favourite vehicles (a Landrover Defender and a VW van).

Despite being a relatively simple marketing campaign without a great deal of thought put into it, it’s a nice little reminder that freedom is a simple concept that doesn’t require buttloads of cash.

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surfing-behind-landrover-defender

surf-brand-tcss

eden-the-critical-slide-society

tcss-vw-van

Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives

This week I’m really enjoying the remarkable work of Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck called Mindset: The New Psychology of Success — an inquiry into the power of our beliefs, both conscious and unconscious, and how changing even the simplest of them can have profound impact on nearly every aspect of our lives.

Here’s an extract which really resonates with me:

carol-dweck-mindset

For twenty years, my research has shown that the view you adopt for yourself profoundly affects the way you lead your life. It can determine whether you become the person you want to be and whether you accomplish the things you value. How does this happen? How can a simple belief have the power to transform your psychology and, as a result, your life?

Believing that your qualities are carved in stone — the fixed mindset — creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over. If you have only a certain amount of intelligence, a certain personality, and a certain moral character — well, then you’d better prove that you have a healthy dose of them. It simply wouldn’t do to look or feel deficient in these most basic characteristics.

[…]

I’ve seen so many people with this one consuming goal of proving themselves — in the classroom, in their careers, and in their relationships. Every situation calls for a confirmation of their intelligence, personality, or character. Every situation is evaluated: Will I succeed or fail? Will I look smart or dumb? Will I be accepted or rejected? Will I feel like a winner or a loser? . . .

There’s another mindset in which these traits are not simply a hand you’re dealt and have to live with, always trying to convince yourself and others that you have a royal flush when you’re secretly worried it’s a pair of tens. In this mindset, the hand you’re dealt is just the starting point for development. This growth mindset is based on the belief that your basic qualities are things you can cultivate through your efforts. Although people may differ in every which way — in their initial talents and aptitudes, interests, or temperaments — everyone can change and grow through application and experience.

Do people with this mindset believe that anyone can be anything, that anyone with proper motivation or education can become Einstein or Beethoven? No, but they believe that a person’s true potential is unknown (and unknowable); that it’s impossible to foresee what can be accomplished with years of passion, toil, and training.

One of the most basic beliefs we carry about ourselves, Dweck found in her research, has to do with how we view and inhabit what we consider to be our personality. A “fixed mindset” assumes that our character, intelligence, and creative ability are static givens which we can’t change in any meaningful way, and success is the affirmation of that inherent intelligence, an assessment of how those givens measure up against an equally fixed standard; striving for success and avoiding failure at all costs become a way of maintaining the sense of being smart or skilled. A “growth mindset,” on the other hand, thrives on challenge and sees failure not as evidence of unintelligence but as a heartening springboard for growth and for stretching our existing abilities. Out of these two mindsets, which we manifest from a very early age, springs a great deal of our behavior, our relationship with success and failure in both professional and personal contexts, and ultimately our capacity for happiness.

two-mindsets-fixed-growth

The consequences of believing that intelligence and personality can be developed rather than being immutably engrained traits, Dweck found in her two decades of research with both children and adults, are remarkable. She writes:

For twenty years, my research has shown that the view you adopt for yourself profoundly affects the way you lead your life. It can determine whether you become the person you want to be and whether you accomplish the things you value. How does this happen? How can a simple belief have the power to transform your psychology and, as a result, your life?

Believing that your qualities are carved in stone — the fixed mindset — creates an urgency to prove yourself over and over. If you have only a certain amount of intelligence, a certain personality, and a certain moral character — well, then you’d better prove that you have a healthy dose of them. It simply wouldn’t do to look or feel deficient in these most basic characteristics.

[…]

I’ve seen so many people with this one consuming goal of proving themselves — in the classroom, in their careers, and in their relationships. Every situation calls for a confirmation of their intelligence, personality, or character. Every situation is evaluated:Will I succeed or fail? Will I look smart or dumb? Will I be accepted or rejected? Will I feel like a winner or a loser? . . .

There’s another mindset in which these traits are not simply a hand you’re dealt and have to live with, always trying to convince yourself and others that you have a royal flush when you’re secretly worried it’s a pair of tens. In this mindset, the hand you’re dealt is just the starting point for development. This growth mindset is based on the belief that your basic qualities are things you can cultivate through your efforts. Although people may differ in every which way — in their initial talents and aptitudes, interests, or temperaments — everyone can change and grow through application and experience.

Do people with this mindset believe that anyone can be anything, that anyone with proper motivation or education can become Einstein or Beethoven? No, but they believe that a person’s true potential is unknown (and unknowable); that it’s impossible to foresee what can be accomplished with years of passion, toil, and training.

This idea, of course, isn’t new — if anything, it’s the fodder of self-help books and vacant “You can do anything!” platitudes. What makes Dweck’s work different, however, is that it is rooted in rigorous research on how the mind — especially the developing mind — works, identifying not only the core drivers of those mindsets but also how they can be reprogrammed.

Beaches closed as huge 4m waves hit Gold Coast

When I woke up this morning and heard the ocean pounding, I couldn’t resist heading over the hill to the point at Burleigh Heads, one of the best vantage points on the Gold Coast to a decent swell rolling in. While the ocean is well and truly out of bounds for swimmers and families today, with some of the biggest waves to hit our coastline in years, experienced surfers are being treated to some seriously amazing waves. Here’s Burleigh Heads firing on all cylinders this morning.

burleigh-heads-surf

burleigh-heads-gold-coast